Kids Care Pediatrics

801 Tollhouse Avenue

Suite H-6

Frederick, MD 21701

For Life-Threatening Emergencies Call 911
301.696.8813
Fax: 301.696.8832

We are accepting new patients!

Our Practice

 

PRENATAL VISITS/INTRODUCTORY VISITS

 

We look forward to meeting you for a prenatal and/or introductory visit. These are complimentary and are encouraged, but not required, to join our practice.

 

WELL VISITS

For the first 2 years of life children are monitored frequently to ensure proper growth and development, most of these visits include the administration of recommended vaccines to prevent against serious and sometimes life-threatening infections.

The recommended schedule is as follows:

  • Within the first week of discharge from the hospital after the birth of baby

  • At or about 2 weeks of age

  • 1,2,4,6,9, 12, 15,18 and 24 months of age

  • Afterwards, yearly physicals are recommended .


Dr. Baig has privileges at Frederick Memorial Hospital. Once the baby is born the hospital notifies us and Dr. Baig will see the baby at the hospital. In the case of delivery at another hospital, baby can be seen by the on call Dr. and you can call our office for an appointment after the baby gets discharged from the hospital .

SICK VISITS

Same day sick appointments are available for children who are sick and need to be seen, Please call the office during regular office hours to make appointment

AFTER HOURS

For life-threatening emergencies, please call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room, For other urgent matters, Dr. Baig is available over the phone to answer your concerns .

THE PRACTICE

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WHAT TO EXPECT

Becoming a parent can be overwhelming and exhausting, Make sure you get support from family and friends. We are here to guide you through this as well.

Baby should have a complete physical exam before going home from the hospital and then again in the first week of life .

Breast milk is the ideal food for infants formula may be used as an acceptable alternative, Breast-feeding support is available for mothers having difficulty with lactation. Baby's sleep may be disorganized during the first few weeks.  Soothing the baby can be achieved by swaddling, swinging the baby gently and other gentle touches. Many babies may have jaundice which is the yellowish skin color which may last the first week or 2, Your baby will be monitored for jaundice during the stay at the hospital and in the first few weeks of life.

Just as the baby depends on parents for food to grow, the brain depends on experiences to grow and develop, This can be achieved by talking, singing, reading and playing with the baby from the beginning.


EARLY INFANCY

During the first 6 months, baby will be receiving vaccinations on most of the well visits, Growth and development are closely monitored during this time, Baby's nutritional needs will be met completely with breast milk (perferable) or alternatively with formula. Guidance will be provided related to transition from milk to solids.

At this age, discipline is never right for babies and they should always be attended to ensure they're comfortable, well-fed and happy .



LATE INFANCY

Your baby's nutriotional needs will change and they will be becoming gradually more mobile. For this reason, safety issues become very important. You are your child's first teacher. Read and play with them and provide age appropriate toys for them to play with. Encourage their natural curiosity.


PRE-SCHOOL YEARS

Your child will start to explore more and you will need to keep clear limits to provide for their safety. Feeding and sleeping patterns may change.

Use play to teach your child to imagine and solve problems, Plan time to play and interact with friends. Allow him to ask questions, Provide age appropriate answers. Praising good behavior and being consistent with the rules is important.

As they grow, they may become picky eaters, Nap times may vary and change as the child grows as well, Give healthy food choices and avoid junk food.

Your child will start to become more independent and may have temper tantrums, Your pediatrician is available to give guidance during this challenging time.


SCHOOL YEARS

Be a good role model in all areas; be it: nutrition, behavior or safety etc. Set rules and provide positive feedback, Children have individual strengths that need to be identified. Offer support and provide guidance to your child's new Independence and pick your battles. During school years, anger or frustration (or fear) may be noted and may indicate some underlying psychosocial problems.

The Doctor
Roomika Baig, MD


Dr. Roomika Baig has been practicing pediatrics since 1997. She graduated from Dow Medical College in Pakistan and completed her pediatric residency from Maimonides Medical Center in New York in 1997. After finishing her residency she worked in upstate New York, moving to Maryland in 2004 where she joined a private practice in Frederick. Thereafter in 2010 she started her independent small practice .

Dr. Baig has been a busy mom of four kids who have become successful adults by the Grace of God.

In her spare time she enjoys spending time with her family, reading and walking.
She is a diplomat of American Board of Pediatrics.

She has special interest in newborns, infant care, asthma, allergy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

At our practice we believe in collaboration between patients, parents, caregivers and extended family to promote total well-being of each patient.

Victoria Schwarzenberg, Nurse Practitioner

Victoria Schwarzenberg has been practicing as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner for 20 years.  She initially received her nursing degree in 1988 and worked in the neonatal intensive care unit.  She then received her Masters of Science degree in Nursing where she became certified as a Pediatric Nurse Practitioner at the University of Maryland at Baltimore. 

 

Victoria’s special interests include preventative care and nutrition.  She is married, has 5 children, and an adorable Pomeranian.  She enjoys running, hiking, reading, and spending time socializing and cooking with her family.